History of Lost Dutchman Days

First mention of Lost Dutchman Days – a one-day event – on the front page of the Nov. 27, 1964 issue of the Apache Sentinel. (File photo)

A look back at 54 years of Lost Dutchman Day(s)

In 2018 we celebrate 54 years of Lost Dutchman Days.

A look through the archives of the Apache Junction/Gold Canyon Independent and its predecessor the Apache Sentinel, finds the following about Lost Dutchman Days, from its beginning on Saturday, Jan. 23, 1965, as a one-day event:

Beginnings

“A program of events for Lost Dutchman Days, a celebration planned by the Apache Junction Chamber of Commerce for Jan. 23, has been announced by the chamber,” reads a small news item with a headline of “Lost Dutchman Days program announced” on the front page of the Nov. 27, 1964, Apache Sentinel.

The brief item foretold the future, as the first few years of events were for one day and expanded later to multiple days.

The one-day 1965 celebration was to be held at the Bayless Shopping Plaza and the Superstition Inn. Events planned included a pancake breakfast, art show, a horse-picnic competitive event for horsemen and a Junior Chamber of Commerce (Jaycees) barbecue, according to the Nov. 27, 1964, story.

The Mesa Art League would organize the art show, according to the Dec. 6, 1964, issue.

An official of the Red Mountain Ranch was to put on an exhibition of horse riding, according to the Jan. 8, 1965, issue. It also announced the greased-pig contest where any boy or girl who could catch one could keep it.

“Lost Dutchman Day plans completed” was the headline in the Jan. 15, 1965, issue. New events planned included a dance, street carnival, sidewalk sale and exhibitions of rodeo tricks.

The headline was “Everybody welcome!: Junction’s Lost Dutchman Day offers many attractions” on the front page of the Jan. 22, 1965, issue. “This will be the Junction’s first Lost Dutchman Day, recognizing the much-told tale of the lost gold mine in the Superstition Mountains, and the sponsoring organization, the Apache Junction Chamber of Commerce, has high hopes for turning it into an annual event,” according to the story.

It told of an added attraction at the horse picnic – a fast-draw exhibition by the Colt .45 Peacemakers, a club in Scottsdale; and a staged gunfight by 10 men from the Apacheland movie studio who called themselves the Apacheland Raiders.

Many of the events were free, including the pancake breakfast; the fast-draw exhibition and staged gunfight were to cost 50 cents for adults and 25 cents for children.

Nine competitive events were to be held, including spearing a potato from horseback, picking up flags and setting them down again while riding past given points, zig-zagging through a line of barrels, team and calf roping, and a cowhide drag (a rider sits on a cowhide as a partner drags it with a horse and 30-foot rope over a course marked off with barrels).

“Everybody had a good time at Dutchman Day” was the headline on the front page of the Jan. 29, 1965, issue.

About 3,000 people attended the event. At the horse picnic, more than 1,000 people lined wooden corral rails to watch exhibitions of show horses, jackpot roping, a team tying contest and gymkhana. In one paragraph it was described as the Lost Dutchman Day weekend because an event was held Friday night with a show by Wallace and Ladmo and others in the Apache Junction High School gymnasium.

Some 800 people were served at the free pancake breakfast. An egg-throwing event was popular at a carnival.

1960s

The next event was Saturday, Jan. 22, 1966, and was to include a free pancake breakfast, parade, horse picnic, merchant sales, art show, carnival, bingo and barbecue dinner, according to the Jan. 14, 1966, issue of the Apache Sentinel.

P&M Trail Riders, mounted and wearing their uniforms, were to assist the chamber at the Lost Dutchman Stampede gymkhana non-professional rodeo events behind the Superstition Inn, according to the Jan. 21, 1966, issue. Events were to include a timed cowhide drag, boots and saddle partnership race, jackpot roping and team tying, a $5 jackpot barrel race, flag races, potato races and ribbon races (two horses tied together at the saddle horns with a 7- or 8-foot ribbon and run through a course with barrels, taking care not to break the ribbon).

The event attracted 2,000 people, according to the Jan. 28, 1966, issue.

Food – including a free pancake breakfast, shows, a horse picnic at the rodeo grounds, a dance, entertainment and sidewalk booth sales were planned for the Jan. 28 Lost Dutchman Day, according to the Jan. 6, 1967, issue. The Apache Junction Sheriff’s Posse was to provide police protection.

An estimated 2,000 to 3,000 were expected at the 1967 day, according to a story on the front page of the Jan. 27, 1967, Apache Sentinel. Ten events were to be held at a gymkhana and included hurdles, a rescue race and a cowhide drag race, with trophies awarded to the first-place winner in each of four age groups. A story in a special section on the 1967 Lost Dutchman Day said the Superstitions are a dark and fascinating mystery.

A headline above photos in the Feb. 3, 1967, issue stated that the celebration attracted 5,000 people.

Highlights of the 1968 event were to be a horse picnic at the P&M Trailriders Arena, a barbecue dinner, pancake breakfast and an art exhibit, according to the Jan. 11, 1968, issue. The horse picnic was slated to be a 19-class event with Western equipment a requirement throughout, and included a grand entry, potato race, hurdles, the cloverleaf, flag race, pole bending, a cowhorse race and two matched horse races. A total of 100 entries were expected for the 19-class event, according to the Jan. 25, 1968 issue.

Ron Nix, Apacheland’s daredevil professional stuntman, and Taft School’s “Dirty Shirt Gang” – fifth-grade pupils at the school – were to present special performances at the horse picnic, according to an article on the front page of the Jan. 18, 1968, issue.

Lost Dutchman Day in 1968 attracted more than 5,000 people, with 1,600 served at the pancake breakfast and more than 1,000 people at the horse picnic, according to Feb. 1, 1968, issue.

An open gymkhana and horse show were planned for the 1969 Lost Dutchman Day, according to a front-page article in the Jan. 9, 1969, issue. Horse show entries included showmanship at halter, Western pleasure, stock seat equitation and trail horse class. Gymkhana events, open to five age groups, were cloverleaf barrel race, pole bending, bow-tie and rope race payback. Other events included a matched horse race and exhibition steer riding. The arena was behind Stuckey’s.

Also planned for 1969 was a contest to find the person most resembling Jacob Walzer, legendary owner of the Lost Dutchman Gold Mine; a free pancake breakfast; an art exhibit; and a three-day rock and gem festival.

An estimated 1,500 people enjoyed free pancakes at the 1969 event, where cooks used 68 pounds of pancake mix, 2,000 pats of butter and eight gallons of syrup, according to the Jan. 30, 1969, issue.

1970s

“Annual Lost Dutchman Days feature horse picnic, carnival,” was the headline on the front page of the Jan. 7, 1970, issue, moving away from a one-day event for the first time.

An H.A. Leavitt carnival, the first for the annual event, was to include a variety of rides for children and adults over three days, Jan. 23-25. Other planned events included a horse show and barbecue.

A $250 treasure hunt with Apache Trail merchants was to be held in the three-day 1971 event with a $2 entry fee, according to the Jan. 6, 1971, issue. A parade, four entertainment shows daily and a Pony Express ride from Apache Junction to Scottsdale during the Parada del Sol to advertise Lost Dutchman Days were planned. Because the 1970 carnival with its four rides was so successful, it was planned again but this time with seven rides. Large three-inch buttons in blue and white had been ordered reading “Lost Dutchman Days Feb. 26, 27, 28” that were to be distributed to the public. A two-hour Prospectors Burro Derby was planned for closing day.

A two-hour burro derby was planned for 1971. “You don’t have to ride, but you had better be equipped to push, pull and cajole if you enter the Prospectors Burro Derby during Lost Dutchman Days, Feb. 26, 27 and 28,” according to the front-page article in the Jan. 13, 1971, issue. Burros were to be fully equipped, with pack saddle, pick, shovel, fry pan, coffee pot and a pound each of coffee, beans and flour.

Promoting the community was the topic of a story in the Feb. 18, 1971, issue. “With Lost Dutchman Days right around the corner (Feb. 26-26-28) you might ask yourself this question ‘What have I done to promote Apache Junction and Lost Dutchman Days?’ Each time there is a celebration, a community happening, a worthwhile project, the same people bear the burden of making it go. As a community, we should be proud of Apache Junction, and there’s no better way to show it than by doing our fair share toward promoting it,” it said. It went on to urge residents to invite out-of-town friends and relatives to the event, for all to dress Western, and for all to attend the events.

There were more than 90 entries for the parade, which was to start at the Apache Greyhound Park at Delaware and Apache Trail, according to the Feb. 25, 1971, issue. The south side of Apache Trail was used, with east- and west-bound road traffic on the north side. A midway operated by students had been arranged. Seven mechanized carnival rides were expected. A total of 28 burros were available for the burro race, described as “a hilarious event with pusher-pullers trying to navigate their entries around the laid-out course to see which can cover the most distance in two hours. Anyone who has ever tried to budge a burro, knows what a problem it can become.”

It was the biggest Lost Dutchman Days event ever, according to the March 4, 1971, issue. There were more than 100 parade entries, with 10,000 to 15,000 people lining the parade route, then swarming the P&M Arena to attend the horse picnic and the free entertainment. Since only 14 burros were available, the event was divided into two qualifying races of one lap apiece with the best eight competing in a one-hour, seven-lap race.

An estimated 25,000 to 30,000 people attended the 1972 Lost Dutchman Days events, according to the Jan. 27, 1972, issue. There were 104 entries in the Saturday parade. The horse picnic held at the P&M Arena following the parade attracted one of the largest crowds ever.

In 1973 the Saturday parade route was to change, starting at Delaware Street and heading east on University Drive to Superstition Park where judges stands were to be located, according to the Jan. 11, 1973, issue. Other Lost Dutchman Days events were to include a three-day carnival beside the Superstition Inn and an old-fashioned square dance was planned for Friday. An all-event amateur rodeo, new to Lost Dutchman Days, was to be held Saturday and include calf roping, bareback broncs, bull riding, team roping, steer wrestling, saddle broncs and girls barrel races. The Mesa Arts League was to hold its show in connection with Lost Dutchman Days. A big Lost Dutchman Days rodeo dance was planned for Saturday. Entertainers Wallace and Ladmo were planned for Sunday.

Apache Junction, a community of some 20,000 people, expanded to accommodate an additional 30,000-35,000 over the weekend for the 1973 Lost Dutchman Days, according to the Feb. 1, 1973, issue. There were more than 150 parade entries. Many of the food booths sold out on Saturday. The rodeo was jammed with onlookers, with several hundred standing on the sidelines.

A new addition for the 1974 Lost Dutchman Days was a two-hour variety show Friday night at the elementary school with local talent, according to the Jan. 23, 1974, issue. A map of the parade route showed the start on University Drive at Delaware and the end at State Route 88. Ten members of a parachute group were to jump Saturday from a height of 10,000 feet, forming a star during their descent into the Superstition county park on East University. The Lost Dutchman Days Rodeo was to be Saturday and Sunday, Jan. 26-27, at P&M Arena.

More than 400 cowboys from throughout the southwest, Canada and Mexico were entered in the 1975 Lost Dutchman Days Rodeo, according to the Jan. 22, 1975, issue. The two-hour variety show was to be held Saturday at the elementary school gymnasium. A new activity this year was to be a Junior Olympics on Friday at the high school football stadium with students competing in a variety of athletic events.

New activities for 1976 included a venue – the new arena on the northwest corner of Brown and County Line Road; and the showing Saturday and Sunday of a new film on the Lost Dutchman Gold Mine, according to the Jan. 21, 1976, issue. A 90-minute variety show was to be held Saturday.

A total of 40,000 to 50,000 people attended the 1976 Lost Dutchman Days, according to the Jan. 28, 1976, issue. There were more than 200 entries in the parade. Some 5,000 people jammed the stands at the new P&M Arena to watch the rodeo to watch 450 contestants in the two-day rodeo. Popular with visitors was the showing of a movie on the Lost Dutchman Gold Mine. About 800 people attended the Saturday night variety show.

Nearly 200 entries were planned for the 1977 Lost Dutchman Days Parade on University Drive from Delaware to the Pinal County park at Idaho Road, according to the Jan. 26, 1977, issue.

Attendance records for every scheduled 1977 Lost Dutchman Days event were shattered, according to the Feb. 1, 1977, issue. More than 300 children turned out to compete in the junior Olympics Friday at the high school athletic field. A total of 12,000 to 15,000 people watched the Saturday parade and its 176 entries. The rodeo was expanded in 1977 to a three-day show and also reported record numbers, it said. More than 600 people attended the Saturday variety show.

Three days of rodeo were planned for the 1978 rodeo, according to the Jan. 25, 1978, issue. A golf tournament was held earlier for the event. New this year was overnight camping being allowed at the rodeo grounds.

Crowds were estimated in excess of 50,000 people for the 1978 Lost Dutchman Days events, according to the Feb. 1, 1978, issue. Determined to have front-row seats, early-birds began lining the parade route before daybreak Saturday morning for the parade. An estimated 15,000 to 20,000 people watched the two-hour parade.

A few changes were made for 1979, according to the Jan. 24, 1979, issue. For the first time, Lost Dutchman Days activities were not to center around the Superstition Inn, but at other locations. The carnival, a circus and art show were to be held at Apache Greyhound Park. Several streets were to be used for staging areas for the parade, including Warner and Pinal, both west of Delaware where the parade was to start, according to a map.

More than 25,000 people attended 1979 Lost Dutchman Days events, according to the Jan. 31, 1979, issue. Rodeo chairmen said the three-day rodeo was successful as full-house crowds watched the cowboys compete for prize money.

1980s

A bluegrass band concert was scheduled for Thursday, Jan. 24, as part of the 1980 Lost Dutchman Days, according to the Jan. 2, 1980, issue.

Tickets for the three-day Arizona Rodeo Association sanctioned Lost Dutchman Days Rodeo were $3 for adults and $1.50 for children, according to the Jan. 9, 1980, issue. It was to be held for the first time at the Lariat Roping Arena on North Meridian, just south of Brown Road.

Fourteen rides and more than 30 concessions were planned at the 1980 carnival to be held on North Plaza Drive next to the Post Office, according to the Jan. 23, 1980, issue. A 10,000-meter race was slated for Jan. 26 at parking lot next to the Apache Junction schools administration building.

A carnival with rides and games was planned for six days for the 1981 Lost Dutchman Days, according to the Jan. 21, 1981, issue.

A total of 150 entries were expected for the 1982 Lost Dutchman Days parade, according to the Jan. 27, 1982, issue. Some 100 cowboys and cowgirls were expected for the three-day rodeo.

A five-day carnival was planned for the 1983 Lost Dutchman Days, according to the Jan. 26, 1983, issue. Also planned was a three-day rodeo at the P&M Arena at Brown and Meridian roads. The Saturday parade was to start at Delaware and head east on Superstition Boulevard to the county park.

Inclement weather took its toll on the 1983 events, with only the parade on Saturday bringing out the hardy of spirit in great numbers, according to the Feb. 2, 1983, issue of the Apache Junction Independent newspaper (previously known as the Apache Sentinel).

It was the 20-year anniversary Lost Dutchman Days in 1984, according to the Jan. 11, 1984, issue. Rodeo competitors were expected from all over the southwest, including California, Nevada, Oklahoma, Utah and possibly Canada, according to the Jan. 25, 1984, issue.

Cost for adults for the 1985 Lost Dutchman Days rodeo was $5 at the gate, according to the Jan. 25, 1985, issue. An antique car show was planned, with the traditional events of the rodeo (under the auspices of the Southwest Rodeo Association) and Saturday parade highlighting the Lost Dutchman Days celebration, according to the Jan. 25, 1985, issue.

The 1985 event was wet and successful, according to the Jan. 30, 1985, issue. An estimated 25,000 people attended the Saturday parade and other events despite the wet weather. At the carnival, four adults and one child were struck by lightning when a bolt hit the top of the Ferris wheel and traveled through the metal structure, it said. Three were taken to hospitals and two were treated at the scene.

During the 1986 Lost Dutchman Days, free messages could be sent to anyone in the U.S. or Canada with the help of the Superstition Amateur Radio Club, according to the Jan. 15, 1986, issue. A greased pig contest was to be held at the rodeo for children 10 and under. A calf-dressing contest for adults required a team of two.

A combined 5,000-meter run, 10-mile bike race and one-mile obstacle course was planned for Feb. 28 as part of the 1987 Lost Dutchman Days, according to the Feb. 18, 1987, issue.

The carnival was slated to be in a large parking lot at Apache Trail and Phelps Drive and the rodeo at the P&M Arena, according to the Feb. 25, 1987, issue.

More than 25,000 lined the parade route on Superstition Boulevard for the 1987 Lost Dutchman Days parade, according to the March 4, 1987 issue. A two-day bluegrass jamboree attracted 1,000 people.

New for 1988 was the rodeo was moved to the new Apache Junction Rodeo Grounds off Lost Dutchman Boulevard, east of Idaho Road, according to the Feb. 17, 1988, issue. Tickets were to be $6 a day or $15 for a three-day pass. Break-away calf roping and old-timers roping were new events.

A special event for the 1988 Lost Dutchman Days was the Saturday rededication of the Lost Dutchman Monument (north of the northeast corner of West Apache Trail and North Apache Trail), at the age of 50 the oldest structure in Apache Junction, according to the Feb. 24, 1988, issue. Another new part of the celebration was the Silver Fox/Silver Belle contest, established to honor the older citizens and winter visitors of Apache Junction.

The Apache Junction Lions Club was sponsoring burro races during the Friday rodeo intermission for the 1989 Lost Dutchman Days, according to the Feb. 22, 1989, issue.

1990s

In an effort to focus attention on Lost Dutchman Days and to raise money for The Shelter for Abused Families, armed gunmen stormed into the Dirtwater Springs restaurant Feb. 15, 1990, and kidnapped a wooden Indian, according to the Feb. 21, 1990, issue of the Apache Junction Independent. A ransom note was left and the restaurant’s patrons were asked to donate to the ransom fund, which was to be donated to the shelter.

A 10-day carnival – from Feb. 14-24 – was planned for the 1991 Lost Dutchman Days, according to the Feb. 20, 1991, issue. It was to be in a large lot on the south side of Apache Trail, just west of U.S. Highway 60 and State Route 88.

Lost Dutchman Days 1992, presented by Goldfield Ghost Town, featured free national entertainment including Toy Caldwell, founder and lead guitarist of the Marshall Tucker Band, according to the Jan. 26, 1992, issue. The parade for 1992 was moved to Apache Trail, with the highway closed between Ironwood Drive and Idaho Road from 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 29.

Four performances of the rodeo were planned for 1993 – 1 and 5 p.m. Feb. 26, 2 p.m. Feb. 27 and 1 p.m. Feb. 28, according to the Feb. 24, 1993, issue. People who attended the late Friday rodeo were required to buy a ticket to the dance since it was to be in the arena. The rodeo cost $5 and the dance cost an additional $5. An Action Attractions trick bicycle ramp-jumping team was to perform at the Event Center. The Apache Trail was to be shut down about 9:15 a.m. Feb. 27 until sometime around noon for the parade.

Tickets were $6 a person for the Feb. 25-27 rodeo, according to the Feb. 16, 1994, issue. The rodeo dance, with tickets costing $7.50 a person, was to be Feb. 26 behind the Los Vaqueros Steakhouse.

Much of the 1994 festival – an RV and mobile home show, a travel show, merchandising booths, concession stands, the free entertainment stage and carnival – were to be downtown at Apache Trail and Phelps Drive, just like the last two years, according to the Feb. 23, 1994, issue. Stairs for a new announcers’ booth at the rodeo grounds – replacing a booth that burned in an arson fire – were moved into place a week before the annual event was to start. A trolley was to haul people to and from the dance behind Los Vaqueros Steakhouse because no parking was allowed on Idaho Road, a state highway.

The 1995 carnival was to be at the rodeo grounds on Lost Dutchman Boulevard, according to the Feb. 22, 1995, issue. A special feature of the Saturday parade was to be the U.S. Marine Corps Mounted Color Guard with four Marines and their palominos from the base in Barstow, Calif.

A featured performer at the 1996 rodeo was to be Sissy Barnes, a trick rider, according to the Feb. 21, 1996, issue. The grand marshal of the parade was to ride in a 5,000-pound, four-wheel-drive car built from 4,183 pieces of mahogany wood (1,000 board feet) and powered by two Cadillac engines, according to the Feb. 28, 1996, issue.

A new Arizona State Rifle and Pistol Association air-rifle competition was planned for the 1997 Lost Dutchman Days, according to the Feb. 26, 1997, issue. Former South Dakota Gov. Joe Foss – a U.S. Marine winner of the Medal of Honor in World War II for shooting down 26 enemy planes – was to visit Apache Junction and be part of the festivities.

First place for each gender in a new karaoke competition planned for the 1998 Lost Dutchman Days was to win $250, with children ages 6-9 in a different category winning up to $100, according to the Feb. 11, 1998, issue.

Rodeo is the premiere Lost Dutchman Days event, but it wasn’t the only one for 1998 – the karaoke competition was to have a total of $1,000 in cash prizes, according to the Feb. 25, 1998, issue.

Pulsework’s Mobile Morphis Simulator, a 69-foot ride and museum featuring a Mars Mayhem ride, was planned for the 1999 Lost Dutchman Days, according to the Feb. 24, 1999, issue. It was part of NASA’s Space and Rocket Center and was a mobile extension of the Huntsville, Ala., museum.

2000s

A mule-packing demonstration and contest was planned for the 2000 Lost Dutchman Days, according to a Feb. 15, 2000, issue’s advertisement on the event. The marketplace, free with general admission at the Event Center, was to include food concessions, commercial booths, crafters, pony rides, a petting zoo, train rides for kids and panning for real gold.

An old-fashioned barn dance – less the barn – was to feature live entertainment and bonfires at the Event Center for the 2001 Lost Dutchman Days, according to the Feb. 13, 2001, issue of the Apache Junction Independent.

Jump and flip mechanical bull rides were planned at the Event Center for the 2002 Lost Dutchman Days, according to a Feb. 12, 2002, issue’s advertisement on the event.

New for 2003 was a special rodeo with the Arizona Dream Catchers on the evening of Feb. 21 for the physically challenged to participate in rodeo-style events, according to the Feb. 18, 2003, issue.

The Best of Open Mike Night was planned for 5-10 p.m. Friday, Feb. 27, at the Event Center during the 2004 Lost Dutchman Days, according to the Feb. 24, 2004, issue. It was to be a night of folk, rock, bluegrass, originals, pop, rap, hip hop and beat-boxing.

The Budweiser Clydesdales were housed on the grounds of Goldfield Ghost Town when they were not making special appearances as part of the 2005 Lost Dutchman Days, according to the March 1, 2005, issue.

New for 2006 was a 53,000-pound, 65-foot-long grill on the back of a semi truck – the world’s largest touring grill – serving Johnsonville bratwursts, according to the event program produced by the Apache Junction/Gold Canyon Independent. The Budweiser Clydesdales were a highlight for the 2006 Lost Dutchman Days, according to the Feb. 21, 2006 issue. They were to be stabled at the Goldfield Ghost Town and were slated to make an appearance in the Saturday parade.

Returning in 2007 was the 65-foot-long grill on the back of a semi truck serving Johnsonville bratwursts, according to that year’s event program produced by the Apache Junction/Gold Canyon Independent.

The Cowgirls Historical Foundation was new for 2008, according to that year’s program produced by the Apache Junction/Gold Canyon Independent. They performed special drills and also set the pivots for the grand entry at the Friday, Saturday and Sunday rodeos. The Budweiser Clydesdales, stabled at Goldfield Ghost Town, were to perform at the Friday and Sunday rodeos and in the parade with an eight-horse hitch team and wagon.

Lost Dutchman Days hosted its inaugural Tough Enough to Wear Pink Rodeo on Feb. 27, 2009, according to that year’s program produced by the Apache Junction/Gold Canyon Independent. The event was held to help raise awareness for breast cancer as well as raise funds for treatment and research. The Budweiser Clydesdales were to perform at the Friday and Sunday rodeos and Saturday parade. The Cowgirls Historical Foundation also returned.

2010s

The Lehi Lariats drill team – patriotic young ladies ages 10 to 21 – were new to the 2010 Lost Dutchman Days rodeo, according to that year’s program produced by the Apache Junction/Gold Canyon Independent.

The Cowgirls Historical Foundation returned in the 2011 Lost Dutchman Days, according to that year’s program produced by the Apache Junction/Gold Canyon Independent.

Because of the centennial celebration for the state of Arizona, reenactors of then-Gov. George W.P. Hunt and then-President Theodore Roosevelt were at the 2012 Lost Dutchman Days, according to that year’s program produced by the Apache Junction/Gold Canyon Independent.

The Cowgirls Historical Foundation performed the national anthem on horseback for the Friday rodeo at the 2013 Lost Dutchman Days, according to that year’s program produced by the Apache Junction/Gold Canyon Independent.

In 2014

Rider Kiesner, a trick roper, is new for the 2014 Lost Dutchman Days, according to this year’s program produced by the Apache Junction/Gold Canyon Independent. He is to perform between events at all three days of the rodeo. Also new this year is it is a Grand Canyon Pro Rodeo Association sanctioned rodeo.

New for 2015

Mutton busting for two age groups – 4-5 and 6-7 – was planned for the last event on Sunday, March 1, with young cowboys and cowgirls riding sheep.

Editor Richard Dyer can be reached at rdyer@newszap.com

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